Noteworthy People: Eddie Jefferson

by Jess

Noteworthy People: Eddie Jefferson

 

Renowned for his creation of the Vocalese, Eddie Jefferson was a prominent jazz vocalist and lyricist throughout the 50s and 60s until he died in May 1979 (a dancer he once hired, and then fired, shot him outside Baker’s Keyboard Lounge in Detroit.)

Vocalese is where lyrics are sung note-to-note with previously improvised solos. It differs from scat singing in that it uses lyrics rather than made up words. Scat singing is also often made up on the spot whereas Vocalese is based on a pre-existing solo.

Take “So What” as an example. Jefferson uses the lyrics of Christopher Acemandese Hall combined with the solo of Miles Davis the notorious jazz trumpet player. You can hear how the lyrics are often sung quite quickly to fit with the melody, and the lines are very typical of an instrumental solo rather than vocal. He even talks about Miles Davis and “his horn” within the Vocalese lyrics.

Check out this slower example in his famous “Moody’s Mood for Love” – the melody taken from James Moody’s saxophone solo on a recording of “I’m in the Mood for Love.” Again you can hear the instrumental style of solo behind the lyrics, making a very innovative and unusual style of singing.

Any jazz singers amongst you – why not ask your tutor about Vocalese next lesson?

Or maybe this has made you want to look into this genre of music – contact us about starting jazz singing lessons in London or Manchester: http://beckydellmusicacademy.co.uk/contact/